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More than freedom : fighting for black citizenship in a white republic, 1829-1889

Author: Stephen David Kantrowitz
Publisher: New York : Penguin Press, 2012.
Series: Penguin history of American life.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
The story of the African American journey from slavery to freedom usually begins with heroic abolitionists, peaks with emancipation during the Civil War, and trails off amid Reconstruction's violence. Here, historian Stephen Kantrowitz redefines our understanding of this entire era by showing that the fight to abolish slavery was always part of a much broader campaign by African Americans to claim full citizenship  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: History
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Stephen David Kantrowitz
ISBN: 9781594203428 1594203423 9780143123446 0143123440
OCLC Number: 759695925
Description: 514 pages ; 25 cm.
Contents: A place for "colored citizens" --
Fighting Jim Crow in the cradle of liberty --
Our unfinished church --
The means of elevation --
The heirs of Crispus Attucks --
Outlaws --
The fall and rise of the United States --
Radical reconstruction on Beacon Hill --
"The war of races" --
Burying Lewis Hayden.
Series Title: Penguin history of American life.
Responsibility: Stephen Kantrowitz.

Abstract:

The story of the African American journey from slavery to freedom usually begins with heroic abolitionists, peaks with emancipation during the Civil War, and trails off amid Reconstruction's violence. Here, historian Stephen Kantrowitz redefines our understanding of this entire era by showing that the fight to abolish slavery was always part of a much broader campaign by African Americans to claim full citizenship and to remake the white republic into a place where they could belong. Kantrowitz chronicles this epic struggle through the lives of black and white activists in and around Boston, including both famous reformers and lesser-known but equally important figures. While these freedom fighters have traditionally been called abolitionists, their goals and achievements went far beyond emancipation. Calling themselves "colored citizens," they fought to establish themselves in American public life, both by building their own institutions and by fiercely challenging proslavery laws and practices of exclusion. They knew that equal citizenship meant something far beyond freedom: not only rights, but also acceptance, inclusion and respect.--From publisher description.
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